Truth vs. Lies 101

2 Oct

To die for an idea; it is unquestionably noble. But how much nobler it would be if men died for ideas that were true! — H.L. Mencken

As I watched Alan Grayson’s May interrogation of Inspector General of The Federal Reserve, Elizabeth Coleman, it became apparent to me that this clip is a crash course in lie detecting and should be mandatory viewing material for all young people (and quite a few adults, I might add).  Here is just one example among many:

Grayson: Are you telling me that nobody at The Federal Reserve is keeping track on a regular basis of the losses that it incurs on what is now a 2 trillion dollar portfolio?

Coleman: I don’t know if, if . . . you’re telling me that . . . you’re mentioning that there’s losses.  I’m just saying that we’re not . . . until we actually look at the program and have the information, we are not in a position to say whether there are losses or to respond in any other way to that particular question.

And this was an answer to a yes or no question!

Lies demand wordiness and hesitation because the goal is to distract and deflect, and ultimately to be unclear so that nothing specific can be pinned down.  We are seeing this ad nauseum throughout hearings where The Fed and corporate controllers are finally being called to task for their orchestrated looting of the U.S. economy.  Truth, on the other hand, is spoken without hesitation, in clear and simple language — like Grayson himself being put on the hot seat over his recent comments about Republican-style health care.   This segment illustrates the clarity and unwavering nature of truth.  It is extremely refreshing to see politicians like Ron Paul, Dennis Kucinich, and Alan Grayson stand up to an entire system (politics) that by its very nature deals in deception, half-truths, and blatant falsehoods.

No matter whether we agree or disagree with an issue, we would do well to listen for the language of truth, teach our children to recognize it, and support those people who fearlessly speak truth even when it is not popular to do so.

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