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Will the jobs ever return?

23 Jul

Activist Post: Will the jobs ever return?.

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10 Ways You’re Being Fleeced by Banks

19 Jul

Activist Post: 10 Ways You’re Being Fleeced by Banks.

Goldman Sachs Mafia Pays Hush Money to the S.E.C. Police

19 Jul

Activist Post: Goldman Sachs Mafia Pays Hush Money to the S.E.C. Police.

America Plunging to Bankruptcy While DC Plays Politics as Usual

16 Jul

Eric Blair — Activist Post: America Plunging to Bankruptcy While DC Plays Politics as Usual.

Banksters are Coming for Your Retirement Next

16 Jul

Eric Blair — Activist Post: Banksters are Coming for Your Retirement Next.

USDA Reports Food Shortages: Wall Street ‘Caught Off Guard’ by Severity

3 Jul
Eric Blair

Activist Post

Several recent headlines indicate that food prices will continue their swift climb upward. These troubling new reports show that agriculture production and stored grains are critically low and experts are now predicting food shortages on a grand scale.

Look at a few mainstream headlines: Drought threatens global rice supply in the India Times; VA farmers say heat taking toll on crops, Associated Press; Severe food shortage follows lack of rainfall in Syria; and, finally, Corn prices bolt as USDA downsizes crop estimates, which states that, “Commodity professionals were caught off guard Wednesday by a U.S. Department of Agriculture report showing 1 million fewer acres of corn planted this year than earlier projected, and almost 300 million fewer bushels of corn in storage.” And these articles don’t begin to address crops being damaged by the toxic rain from the Gulf oil disaster.

We are back to recession economics and rapidly heading toward a deeper, longer “Third Depression.”  With all recent economic indicators setting new record lows and deficits at record highs, this ship is only going one way folks, down, down to Chinatown.  This WTC-Building 7-style-controlled-demolition of the U.S. economy has long been engineered by the borderless banksters and has been set in the same way to collapse at a free-fall rate.  With all of the manufactured confusion it may be difficult to know where best to invest your limited assets, but it seems to be clear that Food is on the march.

There were several trend forecasters and financial firms predicting upwards of $200/barrel of oil before the Gulf oil gusher. The “analysts” said this would occur because of the perception of scarcity and a weakening dollar. The oil disaster and the subsequent outrage at Big Oil will surely take care of selling the perception of scarcity, while the Federal Reserve and Congress will surely take care of weakening the dollar.

We’ve seen this Beta test before when oil prices reached their peak of $147 in 2008 sending the price of food to the stratosphere.  Food staples like rice nearly tripled in six months and at times increased 50% in just two weeks, primarily because of record oil prices and a weak dollar in 2008. During this run-up on prices, big box stores like Sam’s Club and Costco were rationing the number of bags of rice customers could buy.  You can bet that Food Crisis Beta 2.010 will be far more severe.

This third factor of actual Food Scarcity, coupled with high oil prices and a feeble dollar, will multiply the severity of increasing food prices.  Whether this scarcity is being engineered to further cull the population or is a genuine imbalance in supply and demand is not important.  The fact is that this reality is playing out in the matrix.  Being aware of this triple-threat to food costs creates an opportunity to soften the recessionary blow, and perhaps offer some economic freedom from those who would like to reduce us all to serfdom.

You don’t have to be an End Times survivalist to believe that storing food is pragmatic.  Everyone with expendable cash can and should design a good food storage and rotation system and buy bulk food as an investment — in addition to creating self-sufficiency. Many rationalists are touting guns, ammo, and gold as good small-scale investments given the despicable agenda unfolding in our matrix.  Certainly those are critical investments in an economy dwindling down to the rationing of necessity, but not everyone is into guns or can afford bundles of gold.  And gold, at the end of the day, can only be traded for necessity.

These recent food alerts seem to indicate that food may be the best short-term investment for the “Average Joe.” It’s simple:  if the retail cost of rice doubles, as it did in 2008, then you (the investor) make 100% return in something that’s immediately tangible and usable.  It’s time to pay the tax penalty for cashing out your mediocre “I-bought-in-to-the-American-Dream” 401K and invest in Food!

INTERRUPT YOUR REGULARLY SCHEDULED PROGRAMMING

Pirates and Poison in the Gulf: Goldman Sachs

1 Jul

Michael Edwards
Activist Post

The Hydra-like creature, Goldman Sachs, has surfaced from the Gulf oil volcano.

Illinois-based Nalco Corporation is responsible for the Corexit 9500 chemical dispersant highlighted by experts as being 4 times more toxic than the oil that is flowing into the Gulf.  Scientists in congressional hearings added that the dispersant is more toxic than other similar dispersant on the market.  Naturally, whenever a major disaster takes place — especially when major, society-altering solutions are being offered — one needs to follow the trail of money and power to see who benefits.  Sure enough, a casual search of Nalco’s Web site reveals their company history; it leads right to the doorstep of Goldman Sachs.

Nalco seems to have started in 1928 Chicago and became immediately involved in both the oil industry and water treatment facilities.  1982 seems to have been a massive turning point for the company as their Web site states, “ORS-419 is used in the tires of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The Nalco product is the only non-silicone product of its type on the market approved by the space shuttle tire’s manufacturer.”  Thereafter, things really seem to have taken off as shown here:

1983:  Nalco breaks ground for a new 300,000-square-foot trio of headquarters buildings in Naperville, representing an investment totaling $90 million.
1984:  Nalco introduces the PORTA-FEED® reusable container system, the most advanced liquid chemical handling system yet introduced.
1985:  Nalco leads the chemical industry in the development of CAER (Community Awareness and Emergency Response), a forerunner of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986 and the CMA Responsible Care® initiative.
1986:  Nalco consolidates groups from the Energy Chemicals Division and Oil Field Services Division to form a new Petroleum Chemicals Division to be headquartered in Sugar Land. The new Petroleum Chemicals Division will include Visco Chemicals, Refinery Process Chemicals, Additives, Adomite Chemicals and Gas and Oil Handling Chemicals Groups.
1989:  Sales top $1 billion.

Then, in 1994 Nalco joined forces with Exxon Chemical to announce the formation of a new alliance “Nalco/Exxon Energy Chemicals, L.P. to provide products and services to all facets of the petroleum and natural gas industries.”

Another name change occurred in 2001 when the company became Ondeo Nalco.  Finally, in 2003, we learn who has taken the reins to lead us into the present.  As their site states:  “The Blackstone Group, Apollo Management L. P. and Goldman Sachs Capital Partners buy Ondeo Nalco.”

Global sales now exceed $4 billion and the Gulf cleanup is in the hands of a group of corporate pals who have brought us such fine moments of humanity such as Blackstone’s  “locust capitalism” hostile takeover binge which triggered a major political backlash in Germany and elsewhere, and the newly proposed austerity measures coming to America.  Apollo Management is in the Wall Street Journal’s Who’s Who in Private Equity with the very human investment strategies of leveraged and distressed buyouts and debt investments — investments now top $37 billion.  And, by now, Goldman Sachs’s reputation precedes itself as having engineered the housing crash and exacerbating a financial meltdown in Greece and across Europe.

Yet, Goldman Sachs is far too gluttonous a creature to be happy with administering the profits from the physical fallout of the Gulf disaster.  The kings of the carbon market — yes, that market that trades nothing but air — have not been having an easy time of it pushing man-made global warming.   In the Gulf, however, they have their cohort, Barack Obama, well positioned to steer the pirate ship back on course.  It was Obama who helped fund the carbon program from its inception after all.  Right on cue, Obama’s e-mail campaign is launched to exploit suffering at the behest of his corporate controllers.

We are living in a full-blown international corporate command and control system where even the most basic rescue efforts are in the hands of proven pirates.  It also has become clear that the pirate flotilla is owned by Goldman Sachs . . . and the president of the United States is the captain.

Related: Gulf Oil Disaster EXPOSED: EPA Lies About Air Quality – AGAIN

The Business of Servitude: Debtors’ Prisons Make a Comeback

17 Jun
Our Future In Chains: The For-Profit Debtors’ Prison System

Michael Edwards


Debtors’ prisons have a sordid history that was thought to be best left behind in Medieval Europe and in Charles Dickens’ fictionalized accounts of the 19th-century hellholes of Victorian England.  America was not to be outdone, debtors’ prisons were widespread in the United States as well, and stories of the conditions in New York’s debtors’ prisons could make one question if repayment of debts was really the purpose; violent criminals were much better clothed and fed.  In fact, history shows that terror and slavery have always had a close relationship with debt, and it follows a path from the Romans right through to 17th century England, and into America from English common law.  However, America chose to abolish her debtors’ prisons a full 36 years before England; first in New York in 1831, and by 1833 the rest of the America had followed.(1)

Now, debtors’ prisons seem to be making a comeback in America.  A recent article in the Star Tribune in Minnesota titled, “In jail for being in debt,” exposes the growing number of citizens going to jail at the behest of banks and a welcoming judicial system.  They write:

“It’s not a crime to owe money, and debtors’ prisons were abolished in the United States in the 19th century. But people are routinely being thrown in jail for failing to pay debts. In Minnesota, which has some of the most creditor-friendly laws in the country, the use of arrest warrants against debtors has jumped 60 percent over the past four years, with 845 cases in 2009, a Star Tribune analysis of state court data has found.”

In our modern era of debt servitude, a PR Push has been designed to reintroduce a serious discussion of debtors’ prisons as a sound solution. What goes beyond alarming is that the full-fledged return of debtors’ prisons might be seen as both appropriately terrifying, as well as a profitable investment opportunity and politically sound decision to be made by state governments struggling with their own looming bankruptcies, and a Federal government struggling politically with the concept of a jobless recovery that is not materializing.

Austerity Programs Doomed to Spread from Eurozone to U.S.

10 Jun

Debt Spreading ‘Like a Cancer’: Black Swan Author

By: Barbara Stcherbatcheff
Writer, CNBC

The economic situation today is drastically worse than a couple years ago, and the euro is doomed as a concept, Nassim Taleb, professor and author of the bestselling book “The Black Swan,” told CNBC on Thursday.

Nassim Taleb
CNBC.com
Nassim Taleb

“We had less debt cumulatively (two years ago), and more people employed. Today, we have more risk in the system, and a smaller tax base,” Taleb said.

“Banks balance sheets are just as bad as they were” two years ago when the crisis began and “the quality of the risks hasn’t improved,” he added.

The root of the crisis over the past couple of years wasn’t recession, but debt, which has spread “like a cancer,” according to Taleb, who is now relived that public attention has shifted to debt, instead of growth.

The world needs to prepare itself for austerity, he warned. “We need to slash debt. Unfortunately, that’s the only solution,” Taleb said.

Other analysts warned about austerity programs spreading from the euro zone to the US where the growth in debt will become unsustainable over the longer term.

READ FULL ARTICLE

Bankruptcy Records Continue to be Broken Without the True Numbers

9 Jun

Only a fraction of those in need file for bankruptcy

By Christine Dugas, USA TODAY
Bankruptcy filings are nearing the record 2 million of 2005, when a new law took effect that was aimed at curbing abuse of the system. Filings could reach 1.7 million this year, says law professor Robert Lawless, but few experts believe that debtors are now gaming the system.

Instead, concern exists about a growing number of Americans who need bankruptcy protection but cannot get any benefit from it or simply cannot afford to file. As their financial problems worsen, that hurts everyone because it can hinder the economic turnaround.

“It’s shocking that we are back to the 2005 level,” says Katherine Porter, associate professor of law at the University of Iowa. “And the filing rate doesn’t even begin to count the depth of the financial pain.”

Bankruptcy laws changed in 2005 because filings skyrocketed and credit card companies and banks wanted to weed out deadbeat borrowers. The law made it harder — more expensive and more restrictive — for individuals to file Chapter 7 bankruptcy, which erases most debts.

Instead of seeking protection from bankruptcy, a number of debt-laden Americans have gone into a “shadow economy,” or informal bankruptcy, according to some experts.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE